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A traditional Moldavian Csángó wedding was held in Budapest. Two people from Hungarian villages in Moldavia were married in Budapest and a traditional reception was held at the recreational center at Almássy tér in the 7th district. The wedding party included friends and relatives from both Moldavia and Budapest – every living Moldavian music playing musician from both places played for the couple – the celebration, music and dancing lasted until the next morning. Best wishes to Szőcs Anna and Istók Ferenc! From Kóka Rozália

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New Publication: A moldvai csángó magyarok (The Hungarian Csángó-s of Moldavia) Pozsony Ferenc – Transylvanian enthnographer Pozsony, presents the origins, history, social structure, culture, identity, fate in the 20th Century, and efforts at protecting the rights of the Hungarian Csángó people that live in Moldavia. Includes photo material. In Hungarian. Gondolat Press – European Folklore Institute. Budapest 2005. ISBN 963 9610 003

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Upcoming concert: Bartók Béla: Blue Beard’s Castle, performed by Kovács István and Szántó Andrea with the Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra. Kiss Ferenc: The Doors of Love, performed by the Etnofon Musical Group with guest artists: Szvorák Katalin, Palya Bea, Szalóki Ági, Dresch Mihály, Balogh Kálmán, Ökrös Csaba, and more. The two works are about love. The Bartók opera emphasizes tragedy, while Kiss’ work is about love being the chance for survival. March 27, 2006 at the new Palace of the Arts in Budapest.

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New Publication: Sámánok Eurázsiában (Shamans in Eurasia) Hoppál Mihály’s second book on this subject. He has been travelling to Siberia and China since the 1970’s doing research on the shamans of various ethnic minority groups there. In this new publication he presents general characteristics along with details on the shamanism of certain areas supported with rich photo material. In Hungarian (shorter versions also available in Finnish and German). Akadémia Press. Budapest. 2005 ISBN 963 05 8295 3

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New Publication: Népzene Bartók Műveiben (Folk music in Bartók’s works). Lampert Vera, Vikárius László – 2nd edition, revised and enlarged Helikon Press, Hungarian Heritage House, Hungarian Ethnographic Museum, Hungarian Institute of Musicology. Budapest. 2005. English translation also available. ISBN 963 7363 092

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New Recording: Szeredás Ensemble: Cuháré – Instrumental music from the Hungary’s Hajdúság region which is located in the northeastern plain. ’Cuháré’ is what they called dance events and balls in the region. The recording includes a booklet of information and tales in Hungarian and English. The recording was put together on the basis of scientific research and field work with informants in the region. CD produced by Szeredás Bt. Announcements by Rőmer Judit, Kálmán Péter and Darmos István

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Ifjú Szívek Hungarian Dance Ensemble celebrates the 50th anniversary since its formation with two gala performances in November 2005 of their new program of dances. This Hungarian dance ensemble, based in Pozsony (Bratislava, Slovakia) was semi professional until 2000 when they earned professional status. Their long standing existence is a true accomplishment given the obstacles posed over the years since Hungarians are considered a minority in Slovakia. Takács András congratulates the dancers, technicians, administrative staff, director Hégli Dusán and lead violin Koncz Gergely on the new program of traditional ’felvidéki’ material, that is; Hungarian, Slovak and Gypsy dances from Slovakia.

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Henics Tamás (originally from a region in southwestern Hungary called Őrség, now residing in Vienna) tells of a small village (280 residents) called Őrisziget, in the heart of Austria’s South Burgenland area. There are two churches in the village, one was built around 1100 and has preserved original peasant frescoes with pagan motifs. On January 26th, Őrisziget hosted a performance by the Kodoba band from Transylvania’s Mezőség region. The event was included in the Austrian–Hungarian Associations listing of Hungarian–Austrian events.

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Diószegi László’s thoughts n the differences between authentic and thematic folk dance choreographies: he says that the two kinds of choreographies need not be placed in seperate categories at festivals. „ ....the only measure of art is quality. Catharsis can be created through a high level performance of authentic folk dance and/or any kind of adaptation thereof.... ...I think that choreographic variety only enriches our movement; not weakening, but strengthening it."

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Reactions of three koboz (mandolin or lute type instrument in use in Moldavia) teachers: Fábri Géza, Bolya Mátyás, Róka Szabolcs, upon criticism of one of their students by Agócs Gergely – president of the jury at a festival of young folk music students from folk music schools.

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Brass Bands From the 1950’s through the1970’s, ethnographers made recordings resulting in more than 10,000. hours of material now in the archives at the Institute of Musicology, with more material in the Hungarian Museum of Ethnography. This tradition was at its peak at the turn of the 19th–20th Centuries. However, today for example, there is a band still actively playing for all types of celebrations in the village of Magyarszentmihály (Mihajlovo) in the Vajdaság (Voivodina) region of Northern Serbia. By Alföldy-Boruss Márk, Pálóczy Krisztina

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Shepherding in the village of Borzova. Shepherding was a profession handed down from father to son. The shepherds’ life all year ’round was dedicated exclusively to the care and grazing of the animals. They were also responsible for curing the sheep of any sicknesses. They lived in a special house on the edge of town. This is part one of Krivdova Éva’s write– up of her conversations with Mezei Lajos, Hungarian shepherd from Borzova in the Gömör region of Southern Slovakia, who learned his profession from his grandfather.

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Theoretical Discussion, Critique Fitos Dezső’s choreography entitled ’Kaluser’ which was presented by the Zemplén Dance Ensemble on February 18 at the Folk Dance Anthology in Budapest, provided the material that sparked this discussion on authenticity and folklore choreography. Commentary by Ónodi Béla, Fitos Dezső, and members of the jury for the Folk Dance Anthology.

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New publication: Fügedi János– Takács András: ’A BERTÓKÉ ÉS TÁRSAI’ – Traditional dances of the village of Jóka. Published by: Csemadok–Dunaszerdahely, Hungarian Institute of Musicology and Gyurcsó István Foundation Books, 2006. In Hungarian. Jóka is a predominantly Hungarian village in the Matyusföld region of Southern Slovakia.

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New Publication [From the tattered memories of the bagpipe of the Hungarian plains]’ Foszlányok az alföldi duda emlékeiből’ By folk music researcher Hankóczi Gyula, published by himself, 2006. A book in Hungarian. Review by Kozák József

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Book review ’Etelközi fohászok’ – A selection of Hungarian Moldavian prayers and religious songs. In Hungarian. By Harangozó Imre and Kővári Réka. Published by Ujkígyós: Ipolyi Arnold Főiskola, 2005. Review by Bakó Katalin

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Flótás Ensemble’s new record: ’Fordulj e nap felé’ [Turn toward the sun] Perferic records 2006 BGCD 159 Traditional Hungarian Moldavian music Review by Bakó Katalin

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New recording: Csobános – Hungarian Moldavian music featuring traditional musician from Moldávia, Legedi László István. Recorded at Etnofon studio 2006 Feb.

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Announcement – competition Hungarian traditional songs and music related to wine, wine making, grape growing, wine drinking. Entry deadline: September 8, 2006. Sponsored by Hungarian Grape and Wine Culture Kft, Village Museum of Szentendre and Etnofon Records.

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New recording: Söndörgő ensemble: Oj Javore Summarizes the last ten years of this band’s work playing traditional music of the Balkans. Review by Bolya Mátyás

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’Örök Kalotaszeg’ – ’Eternal Kalotaszeg’ – Farkas Zoltán a.k.a. ’Batyu’’s new choreography for the Hungarian State Folk Ensemble. Premiered in December of 2005. Review by Lévai Péter, who liked it.

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10th Csűrdöngölő Children’s and Youth Folk Dance Festival was held in the town of Csíkszereda [Miercurea Ciuc] in Transylvania on December 16th, 2005. 26 folk dance groups from Transylvania participated. Report by Bodi Ildikó

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In memory of Bartók Béla Poetry, quotes from Nagy László, Csoóri Sándor, Ratkó József, Szilágyi Domonkos

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Juhos Kiss Sándor’s paintings Originally from the Transylvanian village of Szék, this painter studied at the Arts Lyceum in Kolozsvár [Cluj], then at the University of the Arts in Budapest. In 1993 he recieved the Barcsay Award, which enabled him to make a study trip to Italy. Introduction by writer Széki Soós János

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List of Hungarian folkdance and music camps for the summer of 2006.

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Conversation with Magyar Kálmán, discussing his work in promoting Hungarian culture in the USA, where he lives. Since his arrival in the U.S. in 1962, Kálmán, along with his wife and family, has devoted his life to and been a tireless organizer of folk events, folk dance and music groups, performance and teaching tours for Hungarian folk dancers and musicians and other Hungarian artists – also establishing a museum in New Jersey and other organizations for Hungarian folk arts in the USA. Interview by Abkarovits Endre

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Darmos István makes connections between the ancient symbol of the labyrinth found all over the world and the sacred symbolic content of some ancient forms of Hungarian dance, particularly the ’válltánc’ related to the women’s circle dances done during lent.

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Shepherding in Borzován, Gömör region, South Central Slovakia Part two of this study describes the herder’s tools, hiring the herders, related celebrations and traditional dances of the village. By Krivdova Éva

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Announcing: Traditional music training – from fall 2007– a new department at the Liszt Academy of Music, Budapest The establishment of this department at the Liszt Academy of Music marks a historical moment for Hungarian folk music! Wellknown and respected Hungarian musicians, teachers, ethnomusicologists (see list of names in paragraph 6 of Hungarian article) will be teaching in the new program. Study in this department at the Academy will be open to both Hungarians and foreigners under the same conditions as for the other departments at the Liszt Academy. Interview with Batta András, Rector– Liszt Academy of Music. K. Tóth László.

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Announcement of web page on the traditional dance, music and games of the Bodrogköz region of northeastern Hungary, southeastern Slovakia. Establishment of this web page was supported by the Hungarian Ministry of Cultural Heritage. www.bodrogkoz.hu . By Darmos István

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10th International Legényes Competition – honoring the memory of Martin György. Held every April at the Budapest Cultural Center („BMK”), this year the men’s dance to be performed by contestants was the sűrű tempó from Szék, Transylvania. 17 dancers arriving from all over the Hungarian language area competed and were judged by a jury of dance experts. 6 dancers were given awards. First prize went to Galát Péter– a dancer in the Hungarian State Ensemble. Report by the organizers: Bartók Dance Ensemble and the Budapest Cultural Center

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22nd Zala Folk Dance Festival Held every spring; this year more authentic choreographies were presented, but there were also ’dance theatre provocations’ well worth mention. More than 11 groups are listed here that performed choreographies awarded by the jury. In the authentic category, first prize went to a choreography by young dancers from the Hungarian State Ensemble, entitled „Emlékek a végekről” [Memories of the end]. In the dance theatre category, a choreography by Juhász Zsolt entitled „Metszet” [segment, cross-section] won first prize. Report by Kutszegi Csaba

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Csángó Festival 2006 To be held in two locations in Hungary: August 2–3, 2006 – Öcs, Western Hungary August 4–5, 2006 – 16th Csángó Festival in Jászberény. Benefit performances by Hungarian traditional dancers, singers and musicians from Moldavia and Transylvania’s Gyimes region – to aid Hungarian Csángó students studying at the Szent Erzsébet Lyceum in Gyimesfelsőlok, Romania. Announcement by Kocsán László

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Measuring the Sheep’s Milk in Méra. Csernók Gabriella Éva writes her report on this traditional spring event which happens at Saint George’s Day every year in this village in Transylvania’s Kalotaszeg region. It is the celebration marking of the first time the sheep are let out to pasture in the spring, the measuring of the first milking afterwards and establishment of the economic parameters for the summer sheep milking season. There are age old rituals involved, music and a ball. Young Hungarians from Hungary often travel to Méra for this event.

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The research work of Kaposi Edit. Kaposi Edit [was] one of the most many sided and prolific members of the generation of dance researchers from the period after World War II. Her interests, research work, and writings included folk dance, dance history and every branch of related dance research, dance education, dance criticism, stage and competitive ballroom dance....bearing witness to this are more than 300 of her writings of various types – books, studies, reports, informational articles, critiques, book reviews, interviews.... One of her most well-known works was a book published in 1999: [’The dances and dance life of the Bodrogköz region 1946–1948’]. Felföldi Laszló

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Conversation with Székely Levente. Born in Kolozsvár, Transylvania. Studied music in high school and university in Kolozsvár (Cluj). First began playing village music of Szék with classmates in 1975, which led to playing fiddle in dance house bands in Transylvania ’til 1982. Married dancer from Hungary, Sztanó Hédi in 1981. Emmigrated to Hungary in 1982. Played fiddle with Sebő Ensemble, the Hungarian State Ensemble, then with Kalamajka Ensemble in Budapest until 1991, while working as translator, interpreter, journalist. In 1991, he took a job in Bucharest working for the Hungarian Ambassador. Finished his masters degree in 1998 in Boston. In 1999, he and his family went to New York – he took a post with the Hungarian mission at the U.N. In 2004 he returned to Hungary where he still works for the Foreign Ministry. In March he released a new recording of his favorite music; the traditional music of Nagysajó, a village in Transylvania. Interview by Abkarovits Endre

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Theory of opposite movements in the creation of dance motifs in Hungarian folk dances. Fügedi János examines the sequence of movements and appearance of opposing movements/or gestures in dance motifs of selected traditional dances, as an exercise in analyzing the structure of improvised dances. Such analyzation could give information on learning to better reconstruct and improvise these dances while also providing information on how new motifs could be created that would fit in with the dance tradition. Visual aids – that is, the dance examples referred to in this scientific article, can be viewed on the internet in two places; either in the archive of the FolkMAGazin’s home page, by searching this article, or – on the server of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute of Musicology at www.zti.hu/tanc/ellentet.

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The 43rd Europeade Folk Dance Festival was held in Zamora, Spain, July 19–23, 2006. A gathering of groups representing every ethnic group residing in Europe – more than 3500 participants. For Sztanó Hédi who wrote this report, one of the most exciting moments was during the street ball on the last evening following the gala performance, when she found local Spaniards dancing in the street to music of 3 tarogato and one drum.

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A five member delegation from South Korea visited Hungary in June 2006. They met with the organizers of Hungary’s Folkloriada which was held in August 2004. The 2012 World Folkloriada is to be held in South Korea and the delegation wanted to take note of Hungary’s very successfully organized event, the center of which was the City of Pécs. Report by Héra Éva

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In July of 2006 the 24th meeting of the Ethnochoreology Research Group of ICTM (International Council for Traditional Music) was held in Kolozsvár (Cluj) in Transylvania, Romania. The meeting included presentations on recent research and was attended by some 90 dance researchers from America, Asia, Europe and the Middle East, with several presentations by Hungarian researchers. Next meeting to be held in 2008. Report by Csempesz Péter.

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27th Kaláka Festival – sponsored by Hungary’s ‚favorite’ telephone company: T-Com – friends we have PAID for this festival: T-Com (and its predecessors) have the telephone monopoly in Hungary and are famous for still having amongst the highest telephone rates in Europe – so its a good thing that at least they sponsor this great music festival every year. Of course this year’s festival (July 6–9) was no exception – (the venue is unmatched: the castle ruins in Diósgyőr just outside of the city of Miskolc). Plans are already in the making for next year. By K. Tóth László

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’Fekete-Piros...tánc’ Black/ Red Dance. Review of a dance performance seen at the new Palace of the Arts in Budapest. A co-production of the Budapest nd Honvéd (both professional folk dance) Ensembles performing selected choreographies from 1973-to the present. By Szávai József

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Felföldi Levelek (Letters from Northern Hungary) This is the name of the Ifjú Szívek Dance Ensemble’s newest full length program. This professional group is based in Pozsony (Bratislava) in Slovakia; director Hegli Dusan. The new program includes dances from all ethnic groups of that region. A CD has also been released by the group with music from this new program. Recommendation by Árendás Péter

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Petrás Mária (traditional singer, artist from one of the Hungarian villages in Moldávia) tells about the first meeting of the Csángó Organization in 1990, which was held in the Transylvanian town of Sepsiszentgyörgy (Sfîntu Gheorghe). She also tells about her first trip to Hungary. Excerpt from a new book Kóka Rozália is writing.

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New publication – ’Csodaszarvas’ (Volume II.) – a selection of studies written over the past year. Includes bibliography and report on life work of Kallós Zoltán. Interviews with members of the Muzsikás Ensemble and their complete discography. In Hungarian (Molnár Press 2006). Announcement by contributing writer, Abkarovits Endre

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6 poems by Brasnyó István from a volume entitled ’Sociographia’ – Forum Press, 1973. Újvidék (Novi Sad) in Northern Serbia; and 1 poem by Kenéz Ferenc – first time released here.

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On the world of motifs in the traditional decorative folk arts and culture of the Kalotaszeg region of Transylvania. By Eplényi Anna

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Győri Károly (1955–2006) We all mourn the recent death of the Vujcsics Ensemble’s fiddler. By Henics Tamás.

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The Hungarian Heritage House is five years old An article by Sebő Ferenc printed in Népszabadság 2006 Aug 10. This cultural institution houses the Hungarian State Ensemble, traditional dance and music archives, library, centers for education in all areas of the folk arts; it is also a venue for related performances and events. It was formed as such five years ago as a natural outgrowth of previous institions, the dance house movement and developments in folk arts in Hungarian over the last 35 years. It is a state funded institution which is presently in danger of drastic budget cuts and possible imposed reorganization.

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The Kertész Dance Ensemble is one of Budapest’s amateur folk dance groups. It was formed in 1972 and is still going strong today. It is sponsored by the Budapest Corvinus University, a horticultural university. On rehearsal nights some 180–200 university students can be found practicing in two groups – a training group and an advanced group. The Ensemble organizes trips and activities every month, they go to Transylvania several times a year to attend balls and other traditional events and holidays in various villages. Report by dancer, Eplényi Anna

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“On the common roots of the Hungarian verbunk and Romanian calusari dances”. By Falvay Károly

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Téka Ensemble is 30 years old. Three articles in celebration. This band was amongst the first to form as a result of the dance house movement. They have been instrumental in the revival of Hungarian traditional music. „...Hungarian folk music. They have been working for it, with it – without doubts and detours – for 30 years now. 30 years is a long time. Mozart, József Attila, or from our circles Bankó András, Pallagi Pali weren’t given that much time..... their music students, the bands that have started in their footsteps, unforgettable camps...they have touched the fates, happiness, lives of many people.....” Kelemen László. Also an article by K. Tóth László and speech by Székely Tibor at their 30th anniversary concert at the Hall of the Arts in Budapest.

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Summary of conference Hosted by the Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnography at the Pécs University in Hungary. The event celebrated the birthdays and life work of several department members: Andrásfalvy Bertalan, Kisbán Eszter, Pócs Éva and Filep Antal. Report by Kuti Klára

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Széki Soós János – news from the village of Búza – as the crow flies, Búza is only a skip and a jump from the village of Szék in Transylvania’s Mezőség region: Búza has a new Calvinist church and for the first time a folk dance camp was held there this summer.

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Folk Music Arrangements – Part I; Kiss Ferenc looks into questions surrounding folk music arrangements; discussing definitions of terms from traditional folk music through classical to world music, and popular forms.

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Two letters from Nyisztor Ilona with news from Pusztina [Pustiana] (a Hungarian village in Romanian Moldavia) After 16 years of requests – for the first time on Sunday October 15th – the rosary was said in Hungarian in the Catholic church in Pusztina (in Romania). The congregation looks forward to hearing christmas hymns in Hungarian. The result of Saint Stephan Association’s delegation to the Vatican. Starting 2006 September 22–23, Hungarian children in the village of Pusztina have a place to meet, speak Hungarian and learn about their culture – Puzstina’s Hungarian House has been completed.

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Open House – department of traditional music at the Academy of Music–Budapest. November 25, 2006 10am–5pm – ’kisterem’ Presentation of the various branches of the newly formed folk/ traditonal music department – performances by traditional, revival performers, staff members. Hosting the event: Halmos Béla. See announcement in Hungarian for names of performers and times.

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This article is for the most part an analysis of the famous outlaws (and folk heros) Sobri Jóska and Milfait Ferkó, includes photos. By Kozák József

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2nd Szőttes folk dance camp was held in Lukanénye [Nenince] Aug. 22–27, 2006. The village is in south central Slovakia north of the border town of Balassagyarmat. This year dances from the Mezőség region of Transylvania and Gypsy dances from Slovakia were taught. The camp was organized by Reicher Gellért, Nagy Myrtil, Konkoly László. Report by Záhonyi András

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Bartók’s bagpipers. After a brief survey of the history of Hungarian scientists collecting folk instruments outside of Hungary, this article then focuses on ethnographic collection work done on bagpipers from the period of 1900–1930’s. During that period Bartók collected by far the most bagpipe melodies (175 of them – see chart in article in Hungarian) amongst the various ethnic groups in the region. Bibliography included. By G. Szabó Zoltán

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Grape harvest balls/ the dance master – Balmazújváros – Eastern Hungary. Kordás József ’s recollections from the mid 1900’s „...the dance master had an easy time teaching us, for one thing because already at home – at that time there was neither TV nor radio – so during the long winter evenings grandfather taught the little ones. By the time we went to the dancing school, nearly everyone already knew pretty much how to dance”. As told to Busai Norbert on July 11, 2006.

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Tükrős Ensemble – began playing together 20 years ago. Starting in 2000 they decided to get together with their families every summer for a camp at a location near the town of Martonvásár 30 KM south of Budapest. The children’s games and activities there were inspired and led by Árendásné Bíró Éva „Kiru”. The Tükrős’ childrens CD entitled ’Vígan legyünk’ came out of these experiences. A few words in Kiru’s memory. By Liber Endre

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Conversation with Ökrös Csaba – primás. Born in 1960. Studied classical music from age 8–14. At about age 15, he began to play for a local amateur folk dance group in Northeastern Hungary. In 1976 attended a two week course for dance house musicians in the town of Abaujszántó – teachers were Halmos, Sebő, Timár. From then on he began travelling to Transylvania on weekends and in summer to find the village music, learn whatever possible from musicians there. Attended college in the town of Eger. Moved to Budapest in about 1981 or 82 and played for the Bartók Ensemble. Has toured the US many times since 1983. Csaba has played for the State, Kodály, Budapest Ensembles and with the Újstílus and Ökrös bands. Presently he is teaching at the Vujcsis Tihamér Music School in Szentendre and playing for the Honvéd Ensemble. Abkarovits Endre

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New recording: `Noé mondta` (Noah once said) – Wine songs. Winners of wine song competition and invited guests perform songs and tunes related to the celebrated Hungarian rituals of wine drinking and wine making. Etnofon Records. ER-CD 088.

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7th Conference of Hungarian Folk Music Researchers of the Carpathian Basin. Held September 29th–October 1, 2006 in the town of Zenta [Senta] due south of Szeged in the Voivodina region of northern Serbia. Hungarian ethnomusicologists from all over the Hungarian language area attended. Themes discussed were: collection, transcription, documentation, folk music teaching, preservation, publication. Organized by the Voivodina Hungarian Institute of Culture and the Zenta’s Thurzó Lajos Cultural Center. Report by Borsi Ferenc

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Ethno Cinema February 28th, 2007 is the deadline for submitting films to be shown during the 2007 National Dance House Festival in Budapest. This year Hungarian films made by filmmakers working outside of the Hungarian borders will be featured. Documentary, portrait, short films on Hungarian ethnography and folkore subjects. See announcement in Hungarian for contact information. Announcement by Kovács László – program coordinator

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Hungarian dance house festival in Japan – November 5, 2006 There are presently 4 bands in Japan that play Hungarian traditional music – all of the members of which are Japanese. Many dancers from Japan travel often to Hungary to learn more about the Hungarian dances. Timár Sándor has been to Japan to teach once a year for the last 30 years. At this year’s festival live music was provided for 9 Hungarian dance cycles by three Japanese bands. Report by Takaku Keijiro, hurdygurdy player

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Kecskemet Dance Ensemble celebrated its 30th anniversary with a gala dance performance on the last Saturday of November 2006, at the Erdei Ferenc Cultural Center in Kecskemet (a large town south east of Budapest). Report Komlós József jr.

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3rd Moldavian Csángó folk song competition. Held in the village of Pusztina [Pustiana] in Romanian Moldavia. Children (1st – 8th grade) arrived from 15 villages to compete. This year’s competition, concert and dance that followed were again a great success – proving that Hungarian Csángó folk culture is alive and well. They are planning to make a CD of the most beautiful songs. Plans for next year’s competition are already underway as well. Report by Nyisztor Ilona.

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In celebration of the 35th anniversary of the founding of the Bukovina Székely Folk Womens Chorus in the town of Érd (a suburb of Budapest). The Hungarian Székely people that live today in the town of Érd are people (and their offspring) who were expelled from the Bukovina region of northeastern Transylvania during W.W. II. Report on history of the chorus by folklore researcher Kríza Ildikó.

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Folkdance and Museology An intellectual discussion on the fate of works of Hungarian folk culture. Includes a short history of staged folk dance in Hungary. Discussion ends with listing of 3 possible courses for future work: 1. imitation; 2. folk dance performances created referring to creative-artistic freedom; 3. starting a new direction of `museological folklore-performance`. By Görög András

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Poetry by Kacsirek Ottó (born in Budapest, 1967) is featured in this issue`s `Magtár` – the literary column.

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New Publication: Kun Kovács László [„Táltoserő”] The Strength of the Shaman. This new book is both photo album and literature. A tour through the theme of shamanism from connections in Hungarian folk customs to shamans of today in the far east. 2006. Masszi Kiadó. in Hungarian. Also in Russian and English. ISBN 963 9454 78 8

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New department of folk music. In Janaury 2007 the department will open officially and work begins for setting up the department, planning the first auditions for students and opening the first school year starting in September 2007. Richter Pál is coordinator of this work finally establishing folk music training at the university level in Hungary at the Liszt Ferenc University of Music in Budapest.

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New Recording: Kulcsár Ferenc and the Music of the Nagyenyed region of Transylvania. Recorded in Nagyenyed (Aiud), Romania, 1993. Collected by Pávai István. Notes and photos also by Pávai. Released by Hungarian Heritage House. Budapest. 2006.

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Part 2 – Kiss Ferenc writes about folk music arangements. A discussion of the beat-rock-pop music scene in Hungary, but mainly Budapest, of the late 1960`s and very early 1970`s which preceeded and paved the way for the dance house movement. Mentioned are: the club scene (the rock bands all had their own `club`evenings once a week in addition to performing all over Hungary), Kaláka, Illés, Tolcsvay, Metro, Omega, Sebő, Halmos, Vizöntő, and many others...

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